This is what can happen when boxes are left too close to an illuminated halogen light bulb.

This is what can happen when boxes are left too close to an illuminated halogen light bulb.

We all know that 35-75 watt halogen bulbs impact the environment by consuming up to 10 times more energy than the LED replacement.

But not as many people are aware of how dangerous halogens can be in your home or business because of the intense heat they generate. Recently in the Led Bright Warehouse Store we got first-hand evidence on how careful you have to be with illuminated halogens.

On our display rack we keep a couple of halogens and incandescents illuminated. We do this to help consumers compare LED’s to halogens, especially the energy costs versus the heat they generate. But one time we left our Led Bright Choice bulbs in their cardboard boxes a little too close to one of the halogens. I’m including a photo with my blog to illustrate how the boxes were scorched and could have potentially caused a small fire.

There’s little doubt that homes and businesses are exposed to real hazards from halogens. Although they come in pot lights and are installed mostly in ceilings with heat shields, the intense heat they generate is still a major concern. Electrical fires are an all-too common occurrence and improperly installed pot-lights with halogens can be one of the culprits.

There’s a Led Bright Choice alternative. At HighNet Energy we stock a range of six-watt Samsung spotlight and floodlights that replace the 35-70 watt halogens. They generate little or no heat and will last 30,000 hours or more, compared to about 1,000 hours with halogens and will use 80 percent less energy.

To learn more about energy, LED technologies, and the story of Led Bright and the Light Bulb Games, visit the HighNet Energy website: www.highnetenergy.com

You can also contact me, David Clark-Wilson, at 604-771-9051 or dcw@highnetenergy.com

LED chip technology in the new filament bulb (right) actually produces a more even light pattern than the old incandescent (right) with virtually no heat. The cost of running an incandescent for one year is over $50, compared to just over three dollars for the LED.

LED chip technology in the new filament bulb (right) actually produces a more even light pattern than the old incandescent (left) with virtually no heat. The cost of running an incandescent for one year is over $50, compared to just over three dollars for the LED.